I'm Sam and this is a personal blog.If you want me to tag anything, all you have to do is ask! I'm in a buncha fandoms, and reblog a lot of social justice stuff. More recently, I've gotten into tabletop RPGs and Magic, the gathering, but I tag both of those!

My personal tag is "Sam in real life"

Maturing is realizing how many things don’t require your comment.

—Rachel Wolchin  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: fellinlovewithmelancholy)

(Source: pleatedjeans)

septembriseur:

stillazarafteralltheseyears:

You know what I find truly remarkable about this scene? Is not just that she JUMPS OFF A SPEEDING ALIEN VEHICLE HUNDREDS OF FEET ABOVE THE GROUND but that she knows the EXACT MOMENT to make the jump to not only hit the roof (which, at that height and speed is an incredibly small target) but to hit it at a point where she isn’t going to a) immediately crash into a wall or b) be carried by her momentum over the other side and down a gazillion stories to the ground.

Natasha had to calculate IN HER HEAD IN THE MIDDLE OF A BATTLE the velocity of the alien vehicle, the size of Stark Tower’s roof, how high she was above it (so she wasn’t so high she’d be killed just by the fall to the roof), how long it would take her to make the jump successfully, what position to hit the roof in to minimize the physical damage, possibly even half a dozen other things. A miscalculation either way—too soon or too late—would’ve killed her.

Yeah, when she describes someone genius-level smart in CA:TWS as “slightly smarter than her but only slightly,” she’s NOT KIDDING. Natasha is probably either just as or very nearly as smart as Bruce or Tony or Jane or Betty, her training just meant those smarts were put to use in a different way. And that it’s something she’s trained to manipulate people’s expectations of, just like with her sex. IMO, if Natasha asks to have something explained, it’s not because she doesn’t understand, it’s because she doesn’t want the person she’s asking to KNOW she understands. Because her stock in trade is getting people to underestimate her and then using that against them. And this scene is the proof. Because when no one is watching, she is BRILLIANT.

I think it’s really important to point this out and talk about the gendering of intelligence in the Marvel universe as a whole. There are very few Marvel female heroes who are presented as Geniuses in that classic high IQ/seven doctorates/can solve any problem/slightly insane way. In fact, the only major character who springs immediately to my mind is Valeria Richards, and she’s a child. 

In part, this is probably due to the fact that this kind of intelligence is not considered an attractive female trait, and the primary purpose of most female characters is to be attractive to men. But I think this gifset & commentary highlight another reason: because many female characters would have to be Geniuses (in that way that signifies possession of the quality that IQ tests are supposed to, but don’t necessarily, measure) to do what they do, but the ways in which they exhibit that Genius do not fit within the traditional (masculine) understanding. For instance, Natasha proved herself at a very young age to be someone who was capable of phenomenally rapid problem-solving, skill-adoption, and general learning. That’s how she survived. Where Tony Stark and Reed Richards et al received doctorates, the prize for her intelligence was staying alive. 

I think that the same is true of other female superheroes. I’m thinking also of Storm, who canonically is multilingual, a gifted and expert thief, and whose mutant power seems to include an incredibly complex insight into the mechanism of weather patterns. (She, like Natasha, is also adept at rapid problem-solving.) And Maya Lopez has the ability to learn almost any skill to perfection simply by seeing it demonstrated— I can’t remember what this is termed in the comics, but in real life it would certainly be labeled genius.

So why is the super-intelligence of these women not acknowledged? I think we all know the answer to that.

(Source: momopuff)

chandra-nalaar:

why, why, why do i never joke about lavinia coming out of the closet when i play conjurer’s closet. i am so disappointed with myself honestly

babbleon:

linzeestyle:

emilianadarling:

The Wall of Valor: Every S.H.I.E.L.D. facility has a memorial to the agents lost in the line of duty. S.H.I.E.L.D.’s history can be traced on walls like this. 

This genuinely makes me upset because S.H.I.E.L.D. didn’t exist at the time that Bucky died?? Like, the organization was created at least a year after his death.

Which means that Peggy Carter posthumously made Bucky a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent in order to honour his sacrifice dON’T LOOK AT ME.

And she was doing this at the same time that S.H.I.E.L.D. was unknowingly helping Armin Zola turn Bucky into a weapon that would work to destroy everything he and Steve had fought against during his life why would you do this.

 (tags by linzeestyle )

(Source: sexybucky)

lexiconmegatherium:

O is for Owlbear.

The Secret Origin!

danis-foolery-of-hearts:

gamers-de-culto:

Sir Michael

stop right there, smooth criminal scum

danis-foolery-of-hearts:

gamers-de-culto:

Sir Michael

stop right there, smooth criminal scum

hootbird:

diarrheaworldstarhiphop:

motok-wolf:

why  :c

FUCK THIS SENSATION

FUCK IT

FUUUUCCKKK

THE WORST

it feels exactly how it looks too lol

inresponseitop:

Anna Kendrick Birthday Countdown

» Day Two: Favorite Tweets

My love for Anna Kendrick is probably unhealthy but dammit if it doesn’t feel right.

theodorepython:

maxistentialist:

Tweenbots by Kacie Kinzer:

Given their extreme vulnerability, the vastness of city space, the dangers posed by traffic, suspicion of terrorism, and the possibility that no one would be interested in helping a lost little robot, I initially conceived the Tweenbots as disposable creatures which were more likely to struggle and die in the city than to reach their destination. Because I built them with minimal technology, I had no way of tracking the Tweenbot’s progress, and so I set out on the first test with a video camera hidden in my purse. I placed the Tweenbot down on the sidewalk, and walked far enough away that I would not be observed as the Tweenbot––a smiling 10-inch tall cardboard missionary––bumped along towards his inevitable fate.
The results were unexpected. Over the course of the following months, throughout numerous missions, the Tweenbots were successful in rolling from their start point to their far-away destination assisted only by strangers. Every time the robot got caught under a park bench, ground futilely against a curb, or became trapped in a pothole, some passerby would always rescue it and send it toward its goal. Never once was a Tweenbot lost or damaged. Often, people would ignore the instructions to aim the Tweenbot in the “right” direction, if that direction meant sending the robot into a perilous situation. One man turned the robot back in the direction from which it had just come, saying out loud to the Tweenbot, “You can’t go that way, it’s toward the road.”
The Tweenbot’s unexpected presence in the city created an unfolding narrative that spoke not simply to the vastness of city space and to the journey of a human-assisted robot, but also to the power of a simple technological object to create a complex network powered by human intelligence and asynchronous interactions. But of more interest to me, was the fact that this ad-hoc crowdsourcing was driven primarily by human empathy for an anthropomorphized object. The journey the Tweenbots take each time they are released in the city becomes a story of people’s willingness to engage with a creature that mirrors human characteristics of vulnerability, of being lost, and of having intention without the means of achieving its goal alone. As each encounter with a helpful pedestrian takes the robot one step closer to attaining it’s destination, the significance of our random discoveries and individual actions accumulates into a story about a vast space made small by an even smaller robot.


Man this is still one of my favorite little social projects/experiments.

theodorepython:

maxistentialist:

Tweenbots by Kacie Kinzer:

Given their extreme vulnerability, the vastness of city space, the dangers posed by traffic, suspicion of terrorism, and the possibility that no one would be interested in helping a lost little robot, I initially conceived the Tweenbots as disposable creatures which were more likely to struggle and die in the city than to reach their destination. Because I built them with minimal technology, I had no way of tracking the Tweenbot’s progress, and so I set out on the first test with a video camera hidden in my purse. I placed the Tweenbot down on the sidewalk, and walked far enough away that I would not be observed as the Tweenbot––a smiling 10-inch tall cardboard missionary––bumped along towards his inevitable fate.

The results were unexpected. Over the course of the following months, throughout numerous missions, the Tweenbots were successful in rolling from their start point to their far-away destination assisted only by strangers. Every time the robot got caught under a park bench, ground futilely against a curb, or became trapped in a pothole, some passerby would always rescue it and send it toward its goal. Never once was a Tweenbot lost or damaged. Often, people would ignore the instructions to aim the Tweenbot in the “right” direction, if that direction meant sending the robot into a perilous situation. One man turned the robot back in the direction from which it had just come, saying out loud to the Tweenbot, “You can’t go that way, it’s toward the road.”

The Tweenbot’s unexpected presence in the city created an unfolding narrative that spoke not simply to the vastness of city space and to the journey of a human-assisted robot, but also to the power of a simple technological object to create a complex network powered by human intelligence and asynchronous interactions. But of more interest to me, was the fact that this ad-hoc crowdsourcing was driven primarily by human empathy for an anthropomorphized object. The journey the Tweenbots take each time they are released in the city becomes a story of people’s willingness to engage with a creature that mirrors human characteristics of vulnerability, of being lost, and of having intention without the means of achieving its goal alone. As each encounter with a helpful pedestrian takes the robot one step closer to attaining it’s destination, the significance of our random discoveries and individual actions accumulates into a story about a vast space made small by an even smaller robot.

Man this is still one of my favorite little social projects/experiments.

lildarkvixen:

"you can’t ship that, that character has canon interaction with the opposite sex"

(Source: raggedypaperman)

gutsmanexe:

When my friends start typing NO in all uppercase at me I know I’ve done a good job

(Source: heatcrashemboar)

aaeds:

yungvenuz:

sixpenceee:

Mayflys are a winged insect that have a short lifespan. They mate in such a way that all of them mature in the exact same time. The will die out soon, but for the time being Wisconsin looks like something straight out of a horror movie. 

SOURCE

nnnnnnuh

That’s…not too far south of where I live.